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Death toll climbs to 16 in Kentucky floods, governor says

The National Guard and the State Police used helicopters and boats to rescue dozens of people from homes and vehicles in Kentucky’s eastern coal-mining region. Video footage from local media showed floodwaters reaching the roofs of houses and turning roads into rivers.

“This isn’t over. While we’re doing search and rescue, there are still real dangers out there. The water hasn’t crested in some areas and won’t until tomorrow,” Beshear said during a morning news conference. “We get through this and we will get through this together.”

Climate change is making extreme rainfalls and inland flooding more likely in many parts of the United States, climatologists say. Warmer air temperatures, driven in part of greenhouse gases in the earth’s atmosphere, has created more extreme weather patterns such as the system that has inundated Kentucky this week, they say.

In Garrett, Kentucky, a coal-mining town about 125 miles (201 km) east of Lexington, brown floodwaters swirled through a commercial street and backed up against storefronts, video clips showed. Rescue boats carried people wearing life jackets along the submerged street, past the tops of vehicles poking through the high water.

“Everything is gone,” Garrett resident Rachel Patton told WCHS-TV as she cried. “We had to swim out and it was cold. It was over my head. It was scary.”

At least 300 people in Kentucky have been reported rescued by emergency crews, Beshear said. That number will likely climb, he said, considering that more than 100 people alone have been saved in National Guard airlifts.

Authorities went door-to-door on Thursday in a low-lying area in Jackson, Kentucky, a town of 2,200 people, ordering them to evacuate after inspectors noticed a discharge from the nearby Panbowl Lake Dam.

“Late last night and early this morning, we thought that a real breach was imminent; we are hoping that’s not the case. We were actually a little bit more optimistic but still concerned,” Beshear said on Friday.

Flood warnings

On Friday afternoon, some 22,000 homes and businesses in Kentucky and 2,200 in West Virginia were without power, according to Poweroutage.us.

Flood warnings and watches remained in effect throughout the day for the eastern half of the state, as well as northeastern Tennessee and western West Virginia, where more rainfall was expected to swell waterways already well above their flood stages, the National Weather Service said.

Rivers across the region were expected to crest on Friday and throughout the weekend, while a risk of more dangerous flash flooding remained possible again throughout the day, the weather service said.

As much as a foot of rain (30 cm) has fallen in parts of the region over the last week, according to the service, which forecast another half an inch (1.3 cm) would fall on Friday.

President Joe Biden called Beshear on Thursday night to offer federal help, the governor said. On Friday, Biden declared a major disaster in Kentucky, allowing federal funding to be allocated to the state.

Also on Thursday, West Virginia Governor Jim Justice declared a state of emergency for six counties in his state, where heavy rains caused flooding that disrupted drinking water systems and blocked roads.

In the U.S. West, heavy rains battered Las Vegas, where floodwater washed over streets and rushed onto several casino floors and into parking garages along the famed Las Vegas Strip, video posted on local media and social media showed.

At Circa Casino, workers tried to sweep the water away from the flooded floor, while at Planet Hollywood, water rained down on a casino table from what appeared to be a hole in the ceiling.

(Reporting by Brendan O’Brien in Chicago; Editing by Frank McGurty)


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